Yogyakarta: Angkringan Lik Man


“The Kopi Jos reminded me of the black coffee that I tend to order from a stall nearby the office back in Jakarta, yet this one features a charcoal aroma that sets it apart.

When one can get delicious food at affordable prices, it is small wonder that eating at anangkringan (a street-food vendor that offers pre-cooked local delicacies) has become a way of life for citizens of Yogyakarta and Central Java. Add laid-back ambience to the equation, and you’ve got yourself the perfect dining experience. One of the pioneers behind the angkringan movement in the region is Angkringan Lik Man.

It all began in the 1950s, when a man from Klaten named Pairo made his way to Yogyakarta and opened the first shop that introduced the angkringan concept. By 1969, the business was passed on to his son Pak Man. It was during Pak Man’s reign that the one-of-a-kind Kopi Jos (black coffee with hot charcoal) – a trademark angkringan beverage – was born. Rumour has it that Kopi Jos was actually the result of an experiment conducted by students from local educational institution Universitas Gadjah Mada who were regulars at Pak Man’s joint. Fast forward to 2016, and Pak Man’s son Pak Qobal now heads the business.

Angkringan Lik Man is always packed with customers. During the night-time, people from all walks of life – from buskers and students to local artists and tourists – would be seen hanging about within the vicinity. During my visit, I ordered the obligatory cup of Kopi Josand a serving of Nasi Kucing (rice in banana leaf) along with a number of side dishes, including sate telur puyuh (quail egg satay), tempe goreng, and tahu goreng. As they are displayed on a tray and left out in the cold, it is possible to ask Pak Qobal to heat yourNasi Kucing up.

A dish that betrays its simplistic appearance, Nasi Kucing is the epitome of a roadside home-cooked meal. The Kopi Jos reminded me of the black coffee that I tend to order from a stall nearby the office back in Jakarta, yet this one features a charcoal aroma that sets it apart. According to Pak Qobal, the charcoal reduces the level of acidity in the coffee and in turn helps in neutralising the acidity level in our digestive system.

yogyakarta-heritage-angkringan Lik Man
Jl. Wongsodirjan,
Yogyakarta
Open daily from 6pm-2am
Rp.10,000-15,000/US$0.80-1.20 per person


Started her career as a food writer in 2012, Jessicha Valentina is the online editor of Good Indonesian Food. Jessicha has loved Sayur Asem since she was a wee kid and spends her free time trying to cook it.

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