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Yogyakarta: Sate Klatak Pak Bari

Yogyakarta: Sate Klatak Pak Bari


“You will need to eat in the dark, with no air-conditioner and with the smoke coming from the charcoal stove filling the air around you. What’s even worse is that Pak Bari would open his stall whenever he feels like it.”

Foodies have often been heard showering words of praise for Sate Klatak Pak Bari. Made from goat meat that are skewered using the bars of a bicycle wheel, this unique dish originates from Yogyakarta. According to Pak Bari, its name is derived from the glorious days of his childhood, when he would spend hours looking for klatak, which refers to the orange-coloured melinjo nuts, or gnetum gnemon. He inherited its recipe from his grandmother, who came up with it before Indonesia gained its independence, and accompanied by an unusual name, Pak Bari’s Sate Klatak has so far managed to pique the curiosity of many food aficionados from across the country.

The good
Prior to my visit to Sate Klatak Pak Bari, I actually sampled a similar dish from another outlet. At Pak Bari’s stall, however, there were four types of satay on offer: Sate Bumbu, Sate Klatak, Sate Klatak Pedas, and Sate Klatak Manis. I went with the original Sate Klatak, and without any intention to exaggerate, I must say that Pak Bari’s concoction tasted a million times better than the one that I previously had beforehand. Served with a curry-like soup on the side, the satay was well marinated, which helped in removing the unpleasant odour that would usually emanate from goat meat. The meat itself was tender and flavourful, and it looked like it was grilled evenly as not a single spot on its surface was burnt.

The bad
Each portion consists of only a couple of sticks of the satay, and they were quite small too. You’ll have to order extras when you’re here. Also, Pak Bari’s stall – located inside a hall in a traditional market – does not feature a proper dining area, and there’s no lighting as well. You will need to eat in the dark, with no air-conditioner and with the smoke coming from the charcoal stove filling the air around you. What’s even worse is that Pak Bari would open his stall whenever he feels like it. When questioned why, he replies, “This kind of business doesn’t come with a contract. I’m not attached to anything, so we can open anytime we want.”

The verdict
Despite its unseemly dining setting, one who is partial to lamb or goat meat should pay Pak Bari’s stall a visit when in Yogyakarta. However, it would be best if you give him a call beforehand, just in case Pak Bari decides to not open his stall on that day.

Jl. Kedaton, Pleret
Kecamatan Bantul, Yogyakarta
Central Java
T: 0813 2880 0165
When open, 6.30pm-1am
Rp.20,000/US$1.50 per person


Started her career as a food writer in 2012, Jessicha Valentina is the online editor of Good Indonesian Food. Jessicha has loved Sayur Asem since she was a wee kid and spends her free time trying to cook it.

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